2015: Daniel Coburn, Resurrection

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CoburnW-01.png

2015: Daniel Coburn, Resurrection

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Daniel Coburn
Resurrection
Archival inkjet print, 8 x 10" image on 11 x 14" paper
Edition of 30

Includes 15 x 18 inch archival white mat
Framed: 16 x 20 inches

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The Hereditary Estate functions as a ten-year retrospective of Daniel Coburn’s work as a photographer and conceptual artist. This body of work investigates the family photo album and uses it as a metaphor for the flawed ideals of the American Dream. Coburn was driven by his frustration by with the lack of images that document the troubling nature of his own family’s past, so he set out to create a new archive, to supplement the incomplete family album that most families have. Using photographs made over the last decade, and altered amateur photographs, he weaves a family narrative that is beautiful and terrifying. In the photograph Resurrection, Coburn uses the magic of photography to freeze time. A simple bed sheet takes on qualities of the supernatural and is transformed into a ghost, apparition, or spirit.

Daniel Coburn lives and works in Lawrence, Kansas. His work and research investigates the family photo album employed as one component of a visual infrastructure that supports the flawed ideology of the American Dream. Coburn’s prints are held in collections at several institutions including the Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago), the University of New Mexico Art Museum, and the Mulvane Art Museum. He has been invited as a guest lecturer at events including the International Festival of Photography in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and the Ballarat International Foto Biennale in Victoria, Australia. His first artist’s monograph, The Hereditary Estate, was published by Kehrer Verlag in 2015. Daniel’s work has been published widely, most recently appearing in the International New York Times. Coburn received his MFA with distinction from the University of New Mexico in 2013. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Photo Media at the University of Kansas.

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