Sep
22
to Dec 31

On the Making of Steel Genesis: Sandra Gould Ford

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ON THE MAKING OF STEEL GENESIS: SANDRA GOULD FORD

SEPT 22 - DEC 31, 2017

AUGUST WILSON CENTER
980 LIBERTY AVENUE, PITTSBURGH, PA 15222

GALLERY HOURS:
WED, THURS, 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
FRI, SAT, 11:00 AM - 8:00 PM
SUN, 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM

RELATED EVENTS:


ON MAKING: ARTISTS LATOYA RUBY FRAZIER, SANDRA GOULD FORD AND LYNN NOTTAGE IN CONVERSATION
MONDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2017, 6:00 PM  9:00 PM, AuGUST WILSON CENTER

GUIDED TOURS WITH SANDRA GOULD FORD,
August Wilson center
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29TH, 12:00PM - 1:00PM
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9TH, 2:00PM - 3:00PM
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20TH, 12:00PM - 1:00PM

ON THE MAKING OF STEEL GENESIS: SANDRA GOULD FORD

On the Making of Steel Genesis: Sandra Gould Ford is a collaborative exhibition that explores the work and life of artist Sandra Gould Ford, whom Frazier first met in 2015 at the Women and Girls Foundation’s Pittsburgh Conference. They soon realized they had a deep connection as Black women artists from Southwestern PA interested in working class issues. They discovered that they once lived in the same apartment building, the Talbot Towers in Braddock—Ford as a newlywed and Frazier as a newborn.

This significant exhibition brings together dozens of works from each artist in several mediums: photographs, writings, documents, and videos. Many of the prints have been made by Frazier as cyanotypes, a 19th century photographic process that renders images in shades of blue, referencing an architect's blueprint and the idea of “blue collar” work. Early cyanotypes of plants were used as scientific records by botanists, creating images that fell between document and artwork.

For this exhibition, Frazier made portraits of Ford and the sites of the former Pittsburgh Works Division of the Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, which ran along the north and south shores of the Monongahela River for about three and a half miles. These sensitive portraits show many facets of Ford: worker, writer, artist, and mother. Ford’s life experience and knowledge became a way for Frazier to understand what life was like in the mills and what life was like when legendary figures like August Wilson and Teenie Harris were capturing the diversity of Black life in Pittsburgh. Frazier’s breathtaking aerial views show how Pittsburgh has changed--with new condos, retail centers, and barren fields, replacing the factories.

Ford had worked as a clerk and secretary at the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company. Founded in 1852, J&L was one of the oldest and largest steel manufacturers in the region. From the late-70s until she was laid off in the mid-80s, Ford learned a tremendous amount about the processes of making steel, and the people who made it. At J&L, cameras were forbidden, however, Ford quietly photographed the blast furnaces, coke ovens, and ladles. Devoted to capturing the spirit of the workers, she diligently photographed inside the plant after it closed. Empathetic for the workers of J&L, Ford carefully photographed the messages they wrote on the plant walls, like “Goodbye Louie” and “Pensions Please.” She also interviewed workers and preserved hundreds of documents, including grievances, death and medical records, and the company magazines.

Ford continues to maintain this archive of photographs, documents, and writings as a history of the mill, a reflection on making steel, and her personal genesis. Excerpts from the archive are included in this exhibition. A renaissance woman, Ford is an artist of many mediums. Her early photographs show influences from W. Eugene Smith, Gordon Parks, and the precisionist paintings of the 1920s, celebrating industry. Later, her photographs depict the dramatic deterioration, and renewal of those lands, in the days and years after the mill closed. These images have an extraordinary eye for the details that were important to those who worked in the factory.

The vibrant conversations that arise from this collaboration speak to the nuances of this region and its history. Fascinated by alchemy, Ford uses the idea of changing lead to gold as a metaphor in her work: turning light and silver into photographs, turning base minerals into steel. Ford also saw a kind of alchemy in this collaboration between Frazier’s concern with conditions that limit humans and Ford’s interest in transcending those conditions.

It is fitting and intentional that this exhibition premier at the August Wilson Center. Much like Wilson’s Pittsburgh cycle of plays, On the Making of Steel Genesis shows the Black experience in Pittsburgh and tells the story of ordinary people working to create something beautiful, meaningful, and true while facing great challenges and systemic injustice.

This exhibition is made possible by a generous grant from The Pittsburgh Foundation. The cyanotypes in this exhibition were created through the generous use of the production space at Pittsburgh Filmmakers/Pittsburgh Center for the Arts.

ABOUT SANDRA GOULD FORD

Sandra Gould Ford is an award-winning author, artist, and accomplished educator who presents writing and arts experiences that encourage, refresh, enrich creative thinking, and inspire. Her first novel, Faraday's Popcorn Factory, was published by St. Martin's Press. Ford has won several writing awards, including the Nelson Algren and Writer's Digest. Ford has also received a Creative Writing Fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and from The Pittsburgh Foundation, and she has been awarded a Dow Creativity Center Fellowship and residencies from the Ucross Foundation, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, Ragdale, Millay, and Dorland. Ford founded Shooting Star Productions, and the Shooting Star Review, a quarterly illustrated, literary magazine that was published for ten years. Ford’s photographs have been published in Talk Magazine and the New Pittsburgh Courier, and her writing has accompanied her photography in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Pittsburgh Press, and Pittsburgh Magazine. Ford holds a master's degree in Creative Writing from the University of Pittsburgh.

ABOUT LATOYA RUBY FRAZIER

LaToya Ruby Frazier (b. 1982) works in photography, video, and performance in order to build visual archives that address industrialism, rustbelt revitalization, environmental justice, health care inequity, family, and communal history. She received the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellows Award in 2015. Her work is exhibited widely in the U.S. and internationally, with notable solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Arts of the Wallonia-Brussels Federation (MAC’s); Brooklyn Museum; Seattle Art Museum; Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston); and Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. In 2015, her first book The Notion of Family (Aperture, 2014) received the International Center for Photography Infinity Award. This fall, Frazier’s new catalogue about coal miners, And From the Coaltips a Tree Will Rise, will be published by MAC’s Grand-Hornu (The Museum of Contemporary Arts Belgium). Frazier is an Associate Professor in the Photography Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

 

Image credit: LaToya Ruby Frazier, Sandra Gould Ford sitting on the Bank of the Monongahela River in Braddock, PA, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown's enterprise, New York/Rome.

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Sep
21
to Dec 31

LaToya Ruby Frazier in Two Parts

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Silver Eye is excited to present an exhibition by LaToya Ruby Frazier held at two separate locations: Silver Eye's Penn Avenue gallery and the August Wilson Center's main galleries. 

ON THE MAKING OF STEEL GENESIS: SANDRA GOULD FORD

SEPT 22 - DEC 31, 2017

AUGUST WILSON CENTER
980 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh

Opening Reception + Cultural Trust Gallery Crawl
Friday, September 22, 2017
5:30 - 10:00 pm

THE NOTION OF FAMILY


SEPT 21 - NOV 18, 2017

SILVER EYE
4808 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh

Opening Reception
Thursday, September 21, 2017
6:00 - 8:00 pm

 

THE NOTION OF FAMILY

Silver Eye presents a selection of LaToya Ruby Frazier’s seminal series The Notion of Family at it’s new Penn Avenue galleryFrazier’s images explore the painful effects of decades of industrial decline, poverty, and systemic racism in her hometown of Braddock, PA. A working class town situated on the bank of the Monongahela River, Braddock’s economy had been rooted in industry since Andrew Carnegie built the Edgar Thomson Steel Works in 1873. A child of the 80s and 90s, Frazier grew up when most of the steel industry had left the region and the War on Drugs decimated her community. Frazier came to use photography and art as a way to question inequality and reclaim history.

The Notion of Family elegantly shifts from images steeped in the humanist documentary traditions of artists like Gordon Parks and Walker Evans, to the conceptual and activist practices of artists like Martha Rosler and Allan Sekula. Frazier’s photographs artfully chronicle life in Braddock for over a decade, capturing its historic industrial beauty and its deterioration, such as with her elegiac images of the closure and destruction of the UPMC Braddock Hospital, the town's largest employer at the time.

The emotional anchors of this series are the deeply felt, intimate portraits of the artist, her mother, and her grandmother. These women represent three lifetimes in Braddock--each generation faced with its own set of dramatic changes in the culture and industry of the region. Through artful composition, these portraits poignantly contrast Frazier with her matriarchs, her family with portrayals of Black identity in the media, and their bodies with the town of Braddock. Frazier also photographs her family's living spaces, paying homage to relics of domestic life, and capturing a heartbreaking loss that mirrors the town outside.

 

ON THE MAKING OF STEEL GENESIS: SANDRA GOULD FORD

On the Making of Steel Genesis: Sandra Gould Ford is a collaborative exhibition that explores the work and life of artist Sandra Gould Ford, whom Frazier first met in 2015 at the Pittsburgh Women’s Conference. They soon realized they had a deep connection as Black women artists from Southwestern PA interested in working class issues. They discovered that they once lived in the same apartment building, the Talbot Towers in Braddock--Ford as a newlywed and Frazier as a newborn.

This significant exhibition brings together dozens of works from each artist in several mediums: photographs, writings, documents, and videos. Many of the prints have been made by Frazier as cyanotypes, a 19th century photographic process that renders images in shades of blue, referencing an architect's blueprint and the idea of “blue collar” work. Early cyanotypes of plants were used as scientific records by botanists, creating images that fell between document and artwork.

For this exhibition, Frazier made portraits of Ford and the sites of the former Pittsburgh Works Division of the Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, which ran along the north and south shores of the Monongahela River for about three and a half miles. These sensitive portraits show many facets of Ford: worker, writer, artist, and mother. Ford’s life experience and knowledge became a way for Frazier to understand what life was like in the mills and what life was like when legendary figures like August Wilson and Teenie Harris were capturing the diversity of Black life in Pittsburgh. Frazier’s breathtaking aerial views show how Pittsburgh has changed--with new condos, retail centers, and barren fields, replacing the factories.

Ford had worked as a clerk and secretary at the Jones and Laughlin Steel Company. Founded in 1852, J&L was one of the oldest and largest steel manufacturers in the region. From the late-70s until she was laid off in the mid-80s, Ford learned a tremendous amount about the processes of making steel, and the people who made it. At J&L, cameras were forbidden, however, Ford quietly photographed the blast furnaces, coke ovens, and ladles. Devoted to capturing the spirit of the workers, she diligently photographed in the plant after it closed. Empathetic for the workers of J&L, Ford carefully photographed the messages they wrote on the plant walls, like “Goodbye Louie” and “Pensions Please.” She also preserved hundreds of documents, including grievances, death and medical records, and the company magazines.

Intended for her unique, yet-to-be published novel Steel Genesis, Ford continues to maintain this archive of photographs, documents, and writings. Excerpts from the archive are included in this exhibition. A renaissance woman, Ford is an artist of many mediums. Her early photographs show influences from W. Eugene Smith, Gordon Parks, and the precisionist paintings of the 1920s, celebrating industry. Later, her photographs depict the dramatic deterioration in the days and years after the mill closed. These images have an extraordinary eye for the details that were important to those who worked in the factory.

The vibrant conversation that arises from this collaboration speaks to the nuances of this region and its history. Fascinated by alchemy, Ford uses the idea of changing lead to gold as a metaphor in her work: turning light and silver into photographs, turning base minerals into steel. Ford also saw a kind of alchemy in this collaboration between Frazier’s concern with conditions that limit humans and Ford’s interest in transcending those conditions.

It is fitting and intentional that this exhibition premier at the August Wilson Center. Much like Wilson’s Pittsburgh cycle of plays, On the Making of Steel Genesis shows the Black experience in Pittsburgh and tells the story of ordinary people working to create something beautiful, meaningful, and true in the face of systemic injustice.

This exhibition is made possible by a generous grant from The Pittsburgh Foundation.

ABOUT LATOYA RUBY FRAZIER

ABOUT SANDRA GOULD FORD

Sandra Gould Ford is an award-winning author, artist, and accomplished educator who presents writing and arts experiences that encourage, refresh, enrich creative thinking, and inspire. Her first novel, Faraday's Popcorn Factory, was published by St. Martin's Press. Ford has won several writing awards, including the Nelson Algren and Writer's Digest. Ford has also received a Creative Writing Fellowship from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and from The Pittsburgh Foundation, and she has been awarded a Dow Creativity Center Fellowship and residencies from the Ucross Foundation, Yaddo, Hedgebrook, Ragdale, Millay, and Dorland. Ford founded Shooting Star Productions, and the Shooting Star Review, a quarterly illustrated, literary magazine that was published for ten years. Ford’s photographs have been published in Talk Magazine and the New Pittsburgh Courier, and her writing has accompanied her photography in the Pittsburgh Post Gazette, Pittsburgh Press, and Pittsburgh Magazine. Ford holds a master's degree in Creative Writing from the University of Pittsburgh

ABOUT LATOYA RUBY FRAZIER

LaToya Ruby Frazier (b. 1982) works in photography, video, and performance in order to build visual archives that address industrialism, rustbelt revitalization, environmental justice, health care inequity, family, and communal history. She received the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellows Award in 2015. Her work is exhibited widely in the U.S. and internationally, with notable solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Arts of the Wallonia-Brussels Federation (MAC’s); Brooklyn Museum; Seattle Art Museum; Institute of Contemporary Art (Boston); and Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. In 2015, her first book The Notion of Family (Aperture, 2014) received the International Center for Photography Infinity Award. This fall, Frazier’s new catalogue about coal miners, And From the Coaltips a Tree Will Rise, will be published by MAC’s Grand-Hornu (The Museum of Contemporary Arts Belgium). Frazier is an Associate Professor in the Photography Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Image credit: LaToya Ruby Frazier, Sandra Gould Ford sitting on the Bank of the Monongahela River in Braddock, PA, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York/Rome.

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Past Present Future: Western Pennsylvania's People and Places
Jun
27
to Sep 2

Past Present Future: Western Pennsylvania's People and Places

Silver Eye celebrates its grand reopening and move to the Penn Avenue Arts District in the Bloomfield-Garfield neighborhood with an exhibition that explores and celebrates the history, current moment, and future of photography in Pittsburgh. This expansive survey exhibition celebrates photographic landscapes and portraits of Western Pennsylvania, spanning over 100 years of image making in the region. The exhibition features the work of over 40 artists and is presented in a nonlinear salon style. Past Present Future creates visual connections between the images and traditions of iconic giants of mid 20th century photography like W. Eugene Smith, Esther Bubley, and Duane Michals and contemporary artists making work today throughout the region. With over 100 photographs and videos, Past Present Future makes visible the overwhelming and complex changes that have occurred in Western Pennsylvania through industrial and demographics shifts over the years. Despite these changes, there is a persistent and timeless beauty in the hills, valleys, and people of the region. This exhibition is a celebration of that beauty and the talented artists who have worked to capture it over the years.

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Fellowship 17: Kris Sanford & Francis Crisafio
Feb
3
to Apr 15

Fellowship 17: Kris Sanford & Francis Crisafio

Fellowship 17 features solo exhibitions from our International Award and Keystone Award winners, selected from an open call for entries in mid-2016. International Award winner Kris Sanford (Mount Pleasant, MI) showcases her series Through the Lens of Desire, which creates implied narratives using snapshots from the 1920s – 1950s. The series brings a contemporary rereading to old photographs to address sensuality and relationships in a subtle way. Keystone Award winner Francis Crisafio (Pittsburgh, PA) showcases HOLDUP in the HOOD: wealth in recession, which documents a collaborative, after-school arts curriculum rooted in self-portraiture. The curriculum and documentation have been ongoing for 13 years and offers young students a chance to learn to look at, and expressively assert, a vision of themselves.

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Materials & Processes: Imaging the Elements of Photography
Sep
2
to Oct 15

Materials & Processes: Imaging the Elements of Photography

Materials & Processes: Imaging the Elements of Photography focuses on a fascinating trend of works that use elements of photographic tools and processes as the subject matter of the images. Normally, the photograph is seen as a window on the world, and the physical properties of the image (paper, screen, ink, pixel, silver) are overlooked. The exhibiting artists in Materials & Processes are Daniel Boardman, April Friges, Jessica Labatte, Andy Mattern, Zach Nader, and Julie Weber.

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The Hereditary Estate: Daniel Coburn + Homo Bulla: Megan Ledbetter
May
27
to Jul 30

The Hereditary Estate: Daniel Coburn + Homo Bulla: Megan Ledbetter

Daniel Coburn’s solo exhibition The Hereditary Estate explores the dark undercurrent of the artist's’ family history through a series of lyrical and mysterious photographs. These images are deeply personal, yet moving and accessible. Coburn was a young adult when his parents revealed their family history—one that is haunted by tragic events related to suicide, domestic violence, mental illness, and substance abuse. Coburn was disturbed when he realized that a lot of family members and events had been erased from his family album. He set out to rewrite the family narrative through a series of photographs that he made, collected, and manipulated. 

Megan Ledbetter’s solo exhibition Homo Bulla is a study of surfaces and life cycles in the American South. The title, which translates to “man is a bubble,” refers to the fragile, beautiful, and temporary nature of human existence.

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2016 Benefit Auction Preview
Apr
15
to May 11

2016 Benefit Auction Preview

This year's Auction featured an extraordinary selection of vintage and contemporary work representing a long list of illustrious talent - from revered masters and prominent mid-career photographers to an exceptional group of young, emerging artists. The Auction Preview Exhibition gives Auction-goers and the public alike a chance to see the lots up for bid at our Benefit Auction held on May 14, 2016.

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Fellowship 16: Ka-Man Tse & Aaron Blum
Jan
29
to Apr 2

Fellowship 16: Ka-Man Tse & Aaron Blum

Fellowship 16 features solo exhibitions from our International Award and Keystone Award winners, selected from an open call for entries in mid-2015. International Award winner Ka-Man Tse (Brooklyn, NY) showcases her series Narrow Distances, which seeks to draw connections between LGBT culture and the Asian Pacific Islander community, as well as Tse’s own ongoing exploration of home, identity, and isolation as someone who was born in Hong Kong and raised in the United States. Keystone Award winner Aaron Blum (Pittsburgh, PA) showcases A Guide To Folk Taxonomy, which explores the mysteries of Appalachia, a cultural region that spans the southern regions of the Appalachian Mountains, through a series of images that are haunting, but beautiful.

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Golden Hour: Thoughts on the Contemporary Photo Book
Dec
4
to Jan 16

Golden Hour: Thoughts on the Contemporary Photo Book

Golden Hour: Thoughts on the Contemporary Photo Book is a new and experimental exhibition presented by Silver Eye Center for Photography. We think that the photo book has entered an age of prodigious production, bold experimentation, and outstanding quality so we wanted to explore new ways of sharing these projects at Silver Eye. We asked some of the most innovative and creative publishers, book makers, and photo centers to show us what their books look like on the walls of a gallery.

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Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity
Sep
18
to Nov 14

Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity

Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity seeks to distinguish the historical and contemporary expressions of the Black Dandy phenomenon in popular culture. The first comprehensive exhibition of its kind, this project highlights young men in city-landscapes who defy stereotypical and monolithic understandings of Black masculinity by remixing Victorian-era fashion with traditional African sartorial sensibilities.

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London/Pittsburgh: Mark Neville
Jun
26
to Sep 12

London/Pittsburgh: Mark Neville

London/Pittsburgh is Mark Neville's first solo exhibition in Western Pennsylvania, and consists of twelve works from two significant projects, presented side-by-side. The pairing of Here is London (2012) and Braddock/Sewickley (2012) contrasts British and American society, further emphasizes social disparities, and yet reveals behavioral characteristics, which are shared regardless of economic circumstance, cultural factors or geographic location.

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A World Imagined: Kelli Connell and Sara Macel
Apr
3
to Jun 13

A World Imagined: Kelli Connell and Sara Macel

A World Imagined features the work of Kelli Connell (Chicago, IL) and Sara Macel (Brooklyn, NY) who each explore the emotional and psychological terrain of personal relationships. Each artists’ projects offer opportunities to reflect on authorship, on photographic construction, and on ways in which we define relationships through our subjective experiences of them. The exhibition is organized by Leo Hsu, adjunct professor, Carnegie Mellon University, writer, and photographer, and David Oresick, Executive Director, Silver Eye Center for Photography.

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Fellowship 15: Projects by Christopher Meerdo & Matthew Conboy
Jan
16
to Mar 21

Fellowship 15: Projects by Christopher Meerdo & Matthew Conboy

Fellowship 15 features solo exhibitions from our International Award and Keystone Award winners, selected from an open call for entries in mid-2014. International Award winner Christopher Meerdo (Chicago, IL) showcases work from a number of his projects, which explore notions of paranoia, entropy, and memorial through use of data processing, photography, installation, and moving images. Keystone Award winner Matthew Conboy (Pittsburgh, PA) showcases Objects in mirror are closer than they appear, which documents a surreal 88-acre skate park located in rural southeast Ohio. This year's juror is Allison Grant, Assistant Curator, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL.

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Close to Home
Oct
24
to Jan 10

Close to Home

The seven artists in this exhibition use photography to explore different notions about home as a physical place with deep emotional connections. In doing so they show us an extraordinary range of feelings toward home: tenderness, anxiety, love, and heartache. Perhaps photography is the ideal medium to express these feelings about home because of its ability to depict complicated things, in the most straightforward way, like a family portrait. The exhibition is organized by David Oresick, Executive Director, Silver Eye Center for Photography, and Dylan Vitone, Associate Professor, Carnegie Mellon University School of Design, and Silver Eye board member.

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Anima: Charlotte Dumas
Aug
8
to Oct 4

Anima: Charlotte Dumas

These intensely personal and up-close portraits of draft horses that serve the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, the Army’s oldest active infantry regiment known as “The Old Guard,” reveal a powerful human connection to these honored animals. Using only the natural light that reaches into the stalls, photographer Charlotte Dumas captures the horses as they relax and move towards sleep after a day of work.

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Here & Now
May
15
to Jul 19

Here & Now

Here & Now highlights the work of artists embarking on physical and emotional journeys to define and discover queerness across the American landscape. Turning to more than just their immediate surroundings, the artists of Here & Now intuitively look for meaning through their personal travels and relationships. “These artists’ instinctive search for context stems out of a desire for human connection and extended placeness fueled by a history of otherness in the world,” said curator Rafael Soldi. “In this exhibition, images become the spaces where new maps are imagined and created; they help us map our own place within a larger territory as we define what it means to be queer today.”

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2014 Benefit Auction Preview
Apr
4
to Apr 23

2014 Benefit Auction Preview

Silver Eye Center presented its 2014 Benefit Auction and exhibition featuring a selection of vintage and contemporary work representing a long list of illustrious talent — from revered masters and prominent mid-career photographers to an exceptional group of young, emerging artists. The work was on display at Silver Eye's Southside gallery before being auctioned off at Clear Story Studio on April 27, 2014.

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Fellowship 14: Projects by Donna J. Wan and Aaron MacLachlan
Jan
31
to Mar 22

Fellowship 14: Projects by Donna J. Wan and Aaron MacLachlan

Fellowship 14: Projects by Donna J. Wan and Aaron MacLachlan, features projects from our two Fellowship winners. International Award winner Donna J. Wan (San Francisco Bay Area) showcases her series In the Landscape and Keystone Award winner Aaron MacLachlan (Pittsburgh, PA) showcases his series Solipsism Postulate. Now in its 14th year, Fellowship identifies and recognizes both rising talent and established photographers from all corners of the globe and from the state of Pennsylvania. This year’s judge was Linda Benedict-Jones, Curator of Photography, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh.

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Pittsburgh Collects
Nov
14
to Jan 11

Pittsburgh Collects

Pittsburgh has an impressive and influential legacy in terms of being home to, and serving as inspiration for, innovative photographers--from Teenie Harris and W. Eugene Smith, to Dorothea Lange and Aaronel deRoy Gruber--pioneering figures whose works and careers have recently been examined via major museum exhibitions, scholarly catalogues and documentary films. With Pittsburgh Collects, Silver Eye turned its lens to the art of collecting images, sharing with the public a behind-the-scenes look at the choices, tastes and contributions of three influential local collectors. Those collectors -- Evan Mirapaul, Graham Shearing and one anonymous collector -- were selected by Brian Lang, curator of BNY Mellon's corporate art collection in Pittsburgh, and Marcia Rosenthal, an independent art consultant/fine art appraiser.

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GREEN
Sep
6
to Oct 26

GREEN

GREEN is a collaborative exhibition showcasing a survey of contemporary aesthetics in photography, all connected by one common, purposely varied idea: green."Green," by definition, can be a noun, adjective, idea, color, lifestyle, and much more. Both photographers and artists alike might be interested in the greenery of nature; the greens on our plates, the greenbacks in our pockets; putting greens, and the laborers who tend them; the effects of greenhouse gases; the uniformed soldiers deployed overseas and the uncertainty of life after their return; or simply the portion of the visible spectrum lying between yellow and blue.

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Carrie Furnace: Contemporary Views
Aug
2
to Aug 24

Carrie Furnace: Contemporary Views

This exhibition of 51 photographs from 32 artists, gathered from an open call for entries, showcased the beauty of the Carrie Furnaces, located in Rankin, PA. While the furnaces were once an integral part of the industry of the Pittsburgh region, they've now "functioned as an urban playground and aesthetic wonder” since they were taken off line in 1978, said Ron Baraff, Director of Museums and Archives at Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area. Today, the Carrie Furnaces lend themselves perfectly to photography with their various textures, constantly changing colors, hidden crevices, and a nostalgic feel of history frozen in time. Graffiti and rusted steel run rampant through the site, adding to the splendor and agedness of this otherwise desolate place.

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8 x 8 PHOTO PARTY: The Exhibition
May
17
12:00 AM00:00

8 x 8 PHOTO PARTY: The Exhibition

The 8 x 8 PHOTO PARTY was a lively and exciting fundraising event held in May 2013. A one-night exhibition and sale of nearly 400 images gathered from an open call for entries held earlier in the year made for a great party, squared! Each photograph, printed to a size of eight by eight inches, was showcased on the walls of Silver Eye's Southside gallery in a grid-like fashion, and then sold throughout the evening for $20. All proceeds from the 8 x 8 PHOTO PARTY directly benefited Silver Eye. The 8 x 8 PHOTO PARTY was made possible in part through the generous support of these local sponsors: Wigle Whiskey, Square Cafe, Penn Brewery, Pittsburgh Winery, Trader Joe's, White Diamond Vodka, YinzBurgh BBQ, Nakama, The Steer & Wheel, ThreeFifty Bakery, e2, Sugarmaid, The Enchanted Garden, Dollar Bank, and NakYouOut.

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Continuum: Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum
Mar
29
to Jul 20

Continuum: Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum

Continuum: Doug DuBois and Aaron Blum explored the bond between mentors and influences in contemporary photography, and those times in an artist's formative development when a special teacher or person changed everything for them. This exhibition focused on one such mentor-mentee relationship -- that between Doug DuBois and Aaron Blum. Each artist was represented by selections from their most recent projects. Doug DuBois' My Last Day at Seventeen is about coming of age in a housing estate in Cobh, County Cork on the southwest coast of Ireland, during the current economic downturn. This was the first time that My Last Day at Seventeen had been exhibited outside of Ireland. Aaron Blum's Born and Raised is a series of portraits of his family and friends as well as landscapes and interior scenes taken in his hometown of New Martinsville, a small rural community in the Appalachian range of West Virginia.

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Fellowship 13: Projects by Diane Meyer and Ross Mantle
Jan
25
to Mar 16

Fellowship 13: Projects by Diane Meyer and Ross Mantle

Fellowship 13: Projects by Diane Meyer and Ross Mantle, featured projects from our two Fellowship winners. International Award winner Diane Meyer (Santa Monica, CA) showcased her series Time Spent That Might Otherwise Be Forgotten and Keystone Award winner Ross Mantle (Pittsburgh, PA) showcased his series California, Pennyslvania. Now in its 13th year, Fellowship identifies and recognizes both rising talent and established photographers from all corners of the globe and from the state of Pennsylvania. This year’s judge was Sam Barzilay, Creative Director, United Photo Industries, Brooklyn, NY.

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No Job No Home No Peace No Rest: Will Steacy
Sep
14
to Dec 15

No Job No Home No Peace No Rest: Will Steacy

Presented against the backdrop of the 2012 election season, Will Steacy's new installation is both a chronicle and a critique of a nation where a once-attainable “American Dream” has been replaced, for so many, by a desperate effort to survive. The exhibition’s title comes from a line in Bruce Springsteen's song, The Ghost of Tom Joad, which in turn alludes to John Steinbeck's classic novel, The Grapes of Wrath. Both of these artist-activists have influenced Steacy, and like them, he fiercely identifies with those who are forgotten, disenfranchised and displaced.

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Fellowship 12: Akihiko Miyoshi and Isa Leshko
May
11
to Jul 17

Fellowship 12: Akihiko Miyoshi and Isa Leshko

Silver Eye Center for Photography is pleased to announce that Akihiko Miyoshi (Portland, OR) and Isa Leshko (Philadelphia, PA) are the winners of the Fellowship 2012 International Photography Competition. Now in its 12th year, this juried competition identifies and recognizes both rising talent and established photographers from all corners of the globe and from the state of Pennsylvania. This year’s juror was Julie Saul, the distinguished owner and director of Julie Saul Gallery in New York City.

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2012 Biennial Benefit Auction Exhibition
Apr
6
to Apr 28

2012 Biennial Benefit Auction Exhibition

The 2012 Benefit Auction presented 50 contemporary and vintage prints from both renowned artists and emerging talent throughout the United States and around the world. Photographs in the exhibition were auctioned off at one of the region's most anticipated charitable art events on Sunday, April 28, 2012.

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Class Pictures: Photographs by Dawoud Bey
Jan
10
to Mar 10

Class Pictures: Photographs by Dawoud Bey

Dawoud Bey, in his first solo exhibition in Pittsburgh, created striking, large-scale color portraits of students at 17 high schools across the United States. Class Pictures brought together 27 of these images depicting youth from a wide economic, social and ethnic spectrum. This highly diverse group portrait created by Bey showcased a generation that challenges stereotypes.

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HomeFrontLine
Sep
13
to Dec 10

HomeFrontLine

HomeFrontLine created a space in which to pause and think about this decade of war in the aftermath of 9/11 and the enormous human, social, economic, and political costs incurred, paying tribute to the selflessness and courage of soldiers and their families.The exhibition also considered how photography and visual imagery shape our understanding and perception of war. The exhibition features images and multimedia projects by eleven international documentary photographers and photojournalists — Claire Beckett, Nina Berman, Kevin Bubriski, Gabriela Bulisova, Ashley Gilbertson, Baptiste Giroudon, Michael Kamber, Benjamin Lowy, Alfonso Moral, Eugene Richards, and Peter van Agtmael.

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Keystone.1/Pennsylvania Photography Biennial
May
24
to Aug 27

Keystone.1/Pennsylvania Photography Biennial

This was the first Pennyslvania photography biennial, which featured sixteen statewide artists working at the forefront of contemporary photography. While regional by virtue of where these photographers live and work, the Biennial’s artists are fully engaged with the global photography community and the plurality of ideas and practices that characterize the medium today. The featured artists included: Donald E. Camp (Philadelphia, PA); Vicki DaSilva (Allentown, PA); Lori Hepner (Pittsburgh, PA); William Larson (Collegeville, PA); Dennis Marsico (Pittsburgh, PA); Edward McHugh (Philadelphia, PA); Lydia Panas (Kutztown, PA); Amie Potsic (Drexel Hill, PA); Robert Raczka (Pittsburgh, PA); Nadine Rovner (Philadelphia PA); Nicki Stager (Bethlehem, PA); Amy Stevens (Philadelphia, PA); Jeffrey Stockbridge (Philadelphia, PA); Sarah Stolfa (Philadelphia, PA); Dylan Vitone (Pittsburgh, PA); and Lori Waselchuk (Philadelphia, PA).

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